Hong Kong protests over China extradition bill By James Griffiths, Helen Regan and Ben Westcott, CNN Updated 1:25 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Bad weather not deterring protesters
From CNN’s Ben Westcott
Protesters put up their umbrellas as rain falls in Hong Kong.
Protesters put up their umbrellas as rain falls in Hong Kong. Ben Westcott
Heavy rain has had little effect on protestors, who number in the tens of thousands and continue to occupy the main roads around the Legislative Council building.

Posted on Ginnyent by Collins on June 12,2019.

Protesters have put up their umbrellas to shelter from the rain — but the humble umbrella is also a symbol of protests in Hong Kong.

During the 2014 mass democracy protests it was used to shield protesters from the tear gas and pepper spray deployed by police, becoming a ubiquitous sight on the frontlines, and giving the movement its name.

15 min ago
Protesters have come prepared for the long haul
From CNN’s Ben Westcott and James Griffiths
There’s a strong sense of community spirit and cooperation within the protest camp, which has sprung up just hours after protesters blocked many of the main roads leading to the government headquarters.

Ginnyent.net

In the sweltering Hong Kong humidity, deliveries of water are met with cheers. The same cheers greet groups of young men and women running through the crowds with material for the barricades, including anti-pepper spray googles.

Stations throughout the protest camp show how well prepared and experienced these young protesters are, handing out food, water, riot gear and medical supplies

What we’re covering here
What’s happening: People are taking part in protests against a controversial extradition bill in Hong Kong.
Why now? Lawmakers were set to debate the bill, which would enable China to extradite fugitives from Hong Kong, in a Legislative Council session on Wednesday morning. That meeting was postponed.
Some context: Critics say the bill will leave anyone on Hong Kong soil vulnerable to being grabbed by the Chinese authorities for political reasons or inadvertent business offenses, and undermine the city’s semi-autonomous legal system.
Expand
20 min ago
Bad weather not deterring protesters
From CNN’s Ben Westcott
Protesters put up their umbrellas as rain falls in Hong Kong.
Protesters put up their umbrellas as rain falls in Hong Kong. Ben Westcott
Heavy rain has had little effect on protestors, who number in the tens of thousands and continue to occupy the main roads around the Legislative Council building.

Protesters have put up their umbrellas to shelter from the rain — but the humble umbrella is also a symbol of protests in Hong Kong.

During the 2014 mass democracy protests it was used to shield protesters from the tear gas and pepper spray deployed by police, becoming a ubiquitous sight on the frontlines, and giving the movement its name.

26 min ago
Protesters have come prepared for the long haul
From CNN’s Ben Westcott and James Griffiths
There’s a strong sense of community spirit and cooperation within the protest camp, which has sprung up just hours after protesters blocked many of the main roads leading to the government headquarters.

In the sweltering Hong Kong humidity, deliveries of water are met with cheers. The same cheers greet groups of young men and women running through the crowds with material for the barricades, including anti-pepper spray googles.

Stations throughout the protest camp show how well prepared and experienced these young protesters are, handing out food, water, riot gear and medical supplies.

40 min ago
‘On the verge of a dangerous situation’
From CNN’s Eric Cheung
Leading pro-democracy lawmakers have held a press conference calling on Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam to withdraw the bill immediately.

“I know that we are on the verge of a dangerous situation. I am very worried and I definitely do not want, I think all Hong Kong people do not want to see our teenagers getting injured or arrested in the course of defending Hong Kong’s core values,” said Democratic Party lawmaker Wu Chi-wai.

“But if this problem really happens, the responsibility lies with Carrie Lam, because she is the one who initiated this. She proposed the bill and decided to press ahead with it, and even today she is still a coward and refused to shelve the evil law. So all responsibilities are with her. I hope she can be responsible for her actions and if she thinks she has two bosses, Hong Kong people are telling you to shelve the evil law, so please serve Hong Kong people as your boss,” added Wu.

Source…. CNN

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